Those with insurance more likely to use preventive services, also spend more on healthcare

The Oregon Health Study, the first randomized controlled experiment to examine the effects of having some type of insurance coverage versus having no insurance at all, has found that while those with insurance report feeling healthier, happier and more financially stable, they also spend 25% more on healthcare than those with no insurance, according to an article in the New York Times.
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Medical home plus health insurance can reduce health inequities for low income adults

Low income adults who were part of a medical home and had health insurance had fewer cost-related access problems, were more likely to be up-to-date with preventive screenings, and reported greater satisfaction with the quality of their care, according to a report by the Commonwealth Fund.
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Unemployed adults have poorer health status than employed adults

Unemployed adults are less likely to receive medical care and fill prescriptions, and have poorer mental and physical health status, regardless of insurance coverage, compared to employed adults, according to a report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
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U.S. Adults with chronic conditions more likely to forego care than those in other high-income nations

Adults living with chronic health problems who live in the U.S. are more likely to forego care than those with chronic health problems living in other high-income nations, according to a report by the Commonwealth Fund.
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