US spending largely driven by technology and high prices, according to a new Commonwealth Fund report

According to a new report by the Commonwealth Fund, health care spending in the U.S. far exceed that of other high-income countries, although spending growth has slowed in the U.S. and in most other countries in recent years.

The U.S. spends more public dollars on health care than all but two of the other countries.  Americans have relatively few hospital admissions and physician visits, but are greater users of expensive technologies like magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machines.  Despite its heavy investment in health care, the U.S. sees poorer results on several key health outcome measures such as life expectancy and the prevalence of chronic conditions. Mortality rates from cancer are low and have fallen more quickly in the U.S. than in other countries, but the reverse is true for mortality from ischemic heart disease. 

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AHA suggests priorities for national health care quality strategy

The American Hospital Association (AHA) suggested to the Department of Health and Human Services that the national health care quality strategy should focus on reducing obesity and diabetes, enhancing patient safety, and giving patients and families a greater voice in decisions about end-of-life care.
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